Updated:2013-08-22

Meteorite Action!

2008-11-20 : Buzzard Coulee (Canada)

First stone found november 28, 2008

U of C meteorite expert Alan Hildebrand and his Masters students, Ellen Milley, have found several pieces of the meteorite fell on Nov. 20 south of Lloydminster, near the Battle River on the border between Alberta and Saskatchewan. The largest piece weighs around 250 grams.

LONE ROCK, SASK. - At first glance, the biggest discovery of Ellen Milley's life looked anything but exciting.Small, blackish lumps on a frozen pond are the kind of sight easily dismissed while driving along rural roads in Saskatchewan.Yet the University of Calgary master's student was immediately intrigued, knowing these lumps were in the area where a meteor was thought to have exploded last week.Stopping the car, she and her travel partner -- U of C meteorite expert Alan Hildebrand-- gingerly stepped on the ice for a closer look.The first lump they investigated turned out to be a leaf. The second was a stone, but of inconclusive origin.But there was no doubt about the third. Hildebrand recognized it instantly as a cosmic treasure -- a 250-gram piece of frozen space rock. (K. Gerein article - Edmonton journal)

 
Credit: Grady Semmens, University de Calgary
 Alan Hildebrand and Ellen Milley on finding place (Source: CTV)

 
Credit: Grady Semmens, University of Calgary
 Ellen Milley islying next meteorite (Source: CTV)

 
Credit: Bruce Edwards
 Ellen Milley inspect meteorite (Source: Edmonton journal)

 
Credit: Bruce Edwards
 Ellen Milley interviewed on the frozen pond of Lone Rock, where she found the meteorite (Source: Edmonton Journal)

 
Credit: Geoff Howe
 A woman's hand next to the meteorite (Source: AP Photo / The Canadian Press)

 
Credit: Grady Semmens, University of Calgary
 Alan Hildebrand and there largest piece (Source: CTV)

 
Credit: CTV
 Meteorite on the frozen pond

 
Credit: CTV
 A second piece found on place

Main Mass 13 kg

 
Credit: Bruce McCurdy
 

 
Credit: Bruce McCurdy
 13 kg of meteorite created a 13 cm hole before bouncing a few centimeter away

 
Credit: Bruce McCurdy
 Map and coordinate of 13 kg meteorite finding location 5057'28"N 10952'16"W